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California State Library

N Ews Notes

OF

California Libraries

VOL 21 NOS. 1-4

JANUARY-OCTOBER, 1926

CALIFORNTA STATE PRINTING OFFICE

CHARLES A. WHITMORE, State Printer

SACRAMENTO, 1927

51300

(Index Supplement.)

Vol. 21, No. 1 JANUARY 1926

News Notes

OF

California Libraries

IN THIS NUMBER-SOME OF THE ITEMS OF INTEREST.

RADIO— LONG BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY, OAKLAND FREE LIBRARY.

NEVADA CITY FREE LIBRARY TO RECEIVE BEQUEST.

ALAMEDA COUNTY— TEACHERS AND LIBRARY WORKERS MEET.

BURBANK HIGH SCHOOL LIBRARY. ,

CUSTODIANS MEETINGS— ALAMEDA, FRESNO, IMPERIAL, MERCED AND STANISLAUS COUNTY FREE LIBRARIES.

MIGRATORY SCHOOLS IN KINGS COUNTY, p. 17.

UNION LIST OF PERIODICALS IN LIBRARIES OF SOUTHERN CALI- FORNIA, p. 49.

SALARY RAISES— BERKELEY, OAKLAND.

LASSEN COUNTY'S ART CLUB, p. 18.

BERKELEY— PACIFIC UNITARIAN SCHOOL FOR THE MINISTRY LIBRARY OFFERS ITS RESOURCES TO ENTIRE STATE.

FOR SPECIAL ARTICLES, SEE CONTENTS.

California State Library

CALIFOBNIA STATE PBHWING OFFICE JOHN B. KING, State Printer SACEAMENTO, 1926 43023

CONTENTS.

Page

DUCKS AND DRAKES 1

THE LIBRARIES I VISITED WHILE IN EUROPE 5

DISCOVERING CALIFORNIA 7

MAP OF CALIFORNIA SHOWING COUNTIES 8

LIST OF COUNTIES HAVING COUNTY FREE LIBRARIES 9

LIST OF LARGER PUBLIC LIBRARIES 10

CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES— NEWS ITEMS 11

DIRECTORY FOR LIBRARY SUPPLIES AND OTHER ITEMS OP

GENERAL INTEREST 35

CALIFORNIA LIBRARY ASSOCIATION 42

CALIFORNIA COUNTY LIBRARIANS 46

LIBRARY CLUBS, ETC 47

BOARD OP LIBRARY EXAMINERS 50

CALIFORNIA STATE LIBRARY 52

Staff, Etc 52

Departments 53

Recent Accessions 57

Caxifoenia State Purlications Received Dubing Octobeb, Novembeb

and Decembee, 1925 86

Caxifoenia City Publications Received Dtteing Octobeb, Novembeb

AND Decembee, 1925 89

Books fob the Blind Added Dubing Octobeb, Novembeb and Decembeb,

1925 90

Issued quarterly in the interests of the libraries of the State by the Califobnia State Llbeaey.

All communications should be addressed to the California State Library, Sacramento, California.

Note. Standing matter is set solid and new matter leaded.

Entered as second-class matter December, 1913, at the post oflSce at Sacramento, California, under the act of August 24, 1912.

Acceptance for mailing at the special rate of postage provided for in Section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized August 27, 1918.

DUCKS AND DRAKES

AT CHICAGO IN MID-WINTER. By Milton J. Ferguson, Librarian, California State Library.

When the librai-y crowd arrived at Chicago in mid-winter it became clear that the Drake Hotel was not named by majority vote of our craft. If it had been, then this great hostelry on the north shore would have been called the Duck Hotel, which probably would cause a smile ; and that would never do in the commercial world. But, as Abraham Lincoln was sometimes forced to rule, the minority has it ; and so Drake it is. If these conventioners were real ducks and drakes, the big hotel which housed them so comfortably, while glad bells rang out the old, rang in the new, would have missed the pleasure of their company ; for the far iiying feathered kind have Cali- fornian and Floridian instincts. Steam heat, fast trains, taxicabs modernity have badly bent many of the habits nature once taught ; and we recklessly expose our ears to the chilling blasts that blow from Lake Michigan, when instinctively we should be twining our brow with posies in a more fragrant zone.

In the published announcements the meetings began December 30 ; but in fact they really got under way two days earlier. The ALA has become big business ; with a budget close to $200,000 a year, with diversified interests ranging from selecting the right book for the child of eight and the adult of eighty- eight and beyond to the intricacies of authorship, the problem of library exten- sion, the burden of library education and the crime (?) of collecting money for a show to tell the world what has taken place during the last half century. The Editorial Committee began the work by spending blue Monday in earnest thought over the things editors think about. And on Tuesday the Executive Board, gathered from this vast domain of ours between the tea stained waters of Boston Bay and the sun-kissed pillars of the Golden Gate, took up the white woman's burden. It decided to make the visit to Philadelphia in 1926 a long and pleasant memory for the most of us, and a definite knock at the consciousness of the average citizen of our great nation ; and to justify the fuller significance of the first word in our corporate name by going across the imaginary boundry line in 1927 to visit our Canadian confreres. In selecting Toronto as its meeting place more than a full year hence the ALA enters into the class of the greater conventions which always know where they are going long

43023

before they put on their going away suit. Other plans, too, it laid in proof of the old adage that the second half century is easier.

The following words I write especially for the information of my own associates in California. And I know my friends of the east and the pacific northwest will pardon my intention to keep California where she belongs : among the foremost of the shock troops in this battle of books. Thank you! All but Californians may now skip to the next paragraph. The Executive Board, under the calm but sustaining direction of that admirable gentleman from Boston, has planned a year of work which logically readies a climax at Philadelphia. We librarians realize how valuable a service we may give. But since its fullest development is not dependent upon our efforts alone ; since we do not. in the patter of efficiency, sell a commodity over the counter and ring up the sale on a shining and musical cash register, we must gain the good will and financial support of the public we are created to serve. Our fiftieth birthday offers a wonderful opportunity for pub- licity and an exhibit of our progress and plans. But shows cost cash : ask the angel on Broadway, or the directors of the P P I E. Shall we beg the man in the street for a penny ; shall we appeal to the hard pressed foundations ; shall we donate from our scanty personal hoardings, if any ; shall we resort to festivals, or the more lucrative gunman methods? No. For once the thing can be done quietly, justly, easily. And " 't were well it were done quickly." The ALA semi-centennial publications will be worth having ; every library, little or big, wanting to be classed as modern must have them. The Executive Board plan of purchase is based on the system of graduated charge now so successfully used by the H. W. Wilson Company ; except in this case the librarian within certain limits fixes the amount, not the publisher. Every library subscribing .$25 to $100 will receive one set of the books ; but if every library elected to pay the minimum there would be no "profit" and therefore little chance of a Avorth seeing show at the City of Brotherly Love. The bars are put low in order that even the smallest may hurdle them in safety. May I urge that California libraries, remember- ing the exposition days of 1915, subscribe to this project in accord with their

NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES.

Jan., 1926

means? Let us say : smallest independent library $25; small $50; medium $100; large and largest $200 and up. A large library wanting two sets and many will need them will get them for $200 ; and additional sets for $100 each. Take your own measure ; send it to the A L A for your subscription bill ; and keep Cali- fornia in the lead. Yesterday is past ; tomorrow is to come ; but today is TODAY.

Now let us go on with the story. It is strange and interesting hoAV much luiman nature there is among librarians. One would almost be justified in making the bold assertion that we are people, just like the store keepers, and the farmers, the Lions and the Soroptimists. This wise observation of mine finds origin in our actions when some new thing comes up. Once there was an E. P. which raised a storm of protest, was held over a year or two, then adopted by practically a unanimous vote. To be sure it was like the small boy in papa's long pants, who was not permitted to wear them long enough to fill them out. Then a while ago came the Board of Education for Librarianship with its schemes to make us wise and useful. But we did not want to change our habits, so we protested and found fault : but at Chicago we take pro- gram. And probably a few years hence it will be hard to make us recall that we were not all. from the first word, enthusi- astic supporters of the Education Board. It is plain that, whether the plans of the Board are immediately practicable, ulti- mately the result of its activity will be better library schools and a more even distribution of them over the United States in order to meet the requirements for an adequately trained library person- nel.

Am I mistaken in thinking that this meeting produced one new group to be added to the already long list of sec- tions? The Library Editors Round Table is a piece of furniture that I do not recall having put my feet under in our profes- sional dining room. And even now I must confess another engagement made it impos- sible for me to tuck my napkin under my chin at this new feast. The menu looked appetizing, though most of the dishes were apparently dashed with publicity sauce. .Since Librarians have not used much of that condiment, or regularly, we ought to be able to consume it in quantities in this year when we are half a hundred years old.

Speaking of food makes me wonder what we are going to do about the break- fasts, luncheons and banquets at our home coming in October. I have heard

of picnics at which the crowd broke up into small groups, each one spreading its own paper table cloth in its own shady spot and consuming its own fried chicken and tilings in its own peculiar way. And then again I have been a jolly member wlien table cloth was put end to end to table cloth, as if actually to demonstrate how many of them will reach from here to somewliere ; and the heaping platters went indiscriminatingly around ; and everybody was filled and happy and friendly.

A while ago, some place back east, there was a family. Subject to the usual ills and discouragements, it grew in size and comeliness. As the fledglings came to full feather, they flew far, or near, into the world to build nests of their own. One caught the glint of sunshine beyond the summit of the Sierra, and went to California for health and wealth and happiness. Another fled to Florida, lured by hopes of finding the fountain of youth, and incidentally of writing a few realty contracts. A third sought pros- perity and position and fame on Wall street. New York City, or perhaps it was in the Loop District, Chicago ; we hope he was not unwi.se enough to take the short cut to the front page headlines and become a gunman sheik. And there were others, whose personal history We do not remember, who fared forth with varying success into lauds of opportunity

When fortune came and the heat of youth had somewhat cooled in their veins, they, each and all, thought of the old home and longed to gather once more at its cheering fireside. It was arranged, this family reunion ; and at Thanksgiving when turkeys are ripe, or perhaps it was at Christmas when good will flowers, they came trooping back in their new clothes, bringing the wives they had found, and their childi-en. odd and spoiled, smart and pretty, or whatever they were. But do you imagine they had the effrontery to include, in their entourage, the cooks who knew just how to tickle their prandial fancy : their Fong. or their Aunt Jemima, or their Lummox? I do not. They may have suggested ripe olives, salted almonds, pralines, or branch celery for part of the fixings ; but mother's way of doing the turkey with dressing, her system of plum pudding, her combination of vegetables who would want anything different.

During the half century just past the library family has grown and scattered. Some of its children are jazzy, perhaps, and wilful and wild. But they all come home in October. Would it not be a fine example of brotherly and sisterly comity if they would all leave their strange cooks

vol. 21, no. 1]

DUCKS AND DRAKES.

aud meats at home aud sit dowu in family style around the old dining room table stretched out with all the spare leaves from the closet under the stair? This very thing the League of Librai'y Commissions, as one of the elderly sisters, has decided to do ; though she hopes for the privilege of putting a- few of her own brand of chestnuts into the dressing. Next?

And I am reminded, at Chicago the League had a very good constructive pro- gram. It was built around our new venture in growing a library system where none grew before. Miss Culver of the Louisiana Library Commission re- counted M'hat is being attempted in that fine old southern state, and what are the prospects of bringing any of her hopes to fruitage. The prompt response on the part of officials and people indicates that the time has come for Louisiana to leap foi-ward, and possibly to outstrip other states which have long been in the run- ning. It is reasonable that a common- wealth so rich in worldly goods, in being and to be, with such a wealth of romantic and cultural background should be able readily to adjust a system of library service to its needs. Fortunately, the parish unit seems to be the one most logical ; so that whatever is done will treat town dweller and country dweller alike.

Tennessee, Iowa, Illinois, and Nebraska have problems peculiar to themselves, as we learned from the well considered ob- servations of the several librarians who spoke thereon. Mr Cunningham, for example, presents a fascinating piece of work worthy of our best library talent ; come into Tennessee, observe our people, their industries, their city and country life, their educational and library equip- ment ; and tell us what is the best, most economical and surest way to get book service to everyone. It is a problem quite as alluring as learning to dance the Charleston, and more profitable than settling (?) the Tacna-Arica dispute. I wish we could accept the invitation ; but to do so requires money to employ one or two of our best librarians, who otherwise could not be released from their present positions, and to cover all the other expenses incident to a well considered survey. In fact the League badly needs a free lance to send on missions like this, to test out some of our theories, to prove some of our practices.

Mr Hirshberg discussed before the League the operation of Ohio's school district public library law. Apparently this device is producing satisfactory re- sults ; though it is worthy of note that

those most familiar with it consider it a step toward the county unit. Another number on the program was possibly there "produced for the first time on any stage" : Miss Ethel M. Fair's story of the library's part in the Better Cities Contest in Wisconsin. See the Library Journal for .lanuary 1.5, 1926 for her article which is significant. When your Chamber of Commerce grows expansive on the general desirableness of your town as a place to live, does it early record and loudly insist upon the merits of your library? If not. whv not? Whose the fault?

For a long while I have doubted that librarians have a money sense. Of course, I knew they were never intended as hoarders ; but I was skeptical whether they could be getters, when getting means the realization of their dreams. But Samuel H. Ilanck in his illustrated story of how American cities spend their in- comes shattered the orthodox arguments against evolution : if the need be great enough the power will develop. Accord- ing to this chart, which was prepared by Miss Marjorie E. Nind of the Grand Kapids Public Library, was expounded by Mr lianck before the Council, and may be found in the Library Journal of January 15, 248 xVmerican cities have shown great restraint in feeding their public libraries. In 1903 they spent nine- teen cents per person for their public book service. That sum gradually, very gradu- ally, rose during the years until in 1923 it reached forty-three cents. By way of contrast the schools started at .$3.86, mounted rapidly to $6.88 in 1919, when a practically perpendicular ascent began which in 1923 touched the figure of $12.87. Between these poor man, x-ich man ratings come the other purposes for which cities raise money none in the sack cloth of the library, none in the royal purple of the school : recreation, charities and hospitals, highways, pro- tection to persons and property. In terms of the purchasing power of money the increase in library support has been about .05, despite the unprecedented twenty year development of this institution of informal instruction and recreation. That chart deserves study and presentation to boards and tax levying bodies.

Now I do not want to be taken as in the position toward the schools of one who bitterly hisses, "You, robber !" Rather I would commend the public for supporting this prop of our democratic form of government, and admiringly cry "wonderfully played." But this double team of ours, school and library, does not appear to be traveling abreast. Is

NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES.

[Jan., 1926

the beginniug of education in the imma- turity of childhood so much more import- ant than its continuance through the later years? Many of the high schools do not have the wealth of books to be found in the public libraries, yet of late years high school librarians have all the better of salary and vacation. The head librarian, who wants to hold his assist- ants offered school positions stands greatly in need of logic and of ability in painting word pictures of things to be. The results as a whole would be better if the library could, at respectful distance, follow in the footsteps of her big sister. One of the charms of my trips to Chicago, during the past year, has been the return by way of Louisiana. Recently I became slightly acquainted with another

section of that state of many flags and romantic background. The newly organ- ized Louisiana Library Association met, January 6-7, at Lafayette, where long ago the British transplanted Evangeline and her people. I had suspected Long- fellow of poetic license in the beauty he gave this heroine of our childhood days ; but if one may judge her by the grace and charm of these distant cousins he wrote with the calmness for which New England is now famous. However, my interest down there is in the develop- ment of a library system. And I predict, now, that in this land of sugar and cotton, timber, oil, sulphur and salt, fish and oysters and what oysters this land of Spanish, French and English civilizations a fine new library growth is about to take place.

vol. 21, no. 1]

EUROPEAN LIBRARIES VISITED.

THE LIBRARIES I VISITED WHILE IN EUROPE.

By Caroline S. M'^aters.

It seems rather a presumption to write of the libraries I visited while in Europe this last summer, from June 19 to Sep- tember 12, when the visits were such that a passing tourist gives where time is very limited and consequently of a very brief nature, and knowledge gained of same, more or less ephemeral.

When one is visiting Europe for the first time, with all the expectancy of a wonderful holiday uufolding before one, and the spell and glamour of the beauty and art of the old woi'ld, the charm of line and form and color, and the fasci- nating novelty of life abroad has taken possession of one, that which has been one's ordinary living life is apt to be swallowed up, and seem quite remote. However, the libraries I visited were all most interesting and seemed types of their class.

Naturally, the American Library in Paris holds first interest among libraries for all librarians sojourning in Europe, and the visit there was most enjoyable and enlightening. I was much interested \o learn from jNIiss Parsons, the director of the library school, that one of the rail- roads in France, with the aid of the Com- mittee of Education and the cooperation of the American Library in Paris, is [jlanuing on establishing in community centers along the railroad, model garden homes for its employees with a library in each community to be administered very much on the same lines as a county free library system, the wife of one of the officials, as a matter of public spirit, acting as custodian without pay.

The library school in connection with the library was in session with the full (|Uota of students, with many countries represented and many more, representing far east, near east, and Europe, inquiring for training, making it quite international in scoiDe.

It was a disappointment not to be able to see the National Library of Paris, but at tliat time it was closed for repairs to the building, not to be reopened until September.

The Vatican Library in the Vatican Museum in Kome seemed a typical museum library where the contents are so valuable that they have to be kejit behind glass- enclosed shelves or behind locked doors. The books and illuminated manuscripts in this library were wonderful to behold. The beautiful tooled leathers and deco- rated bindings, the perfection of the

bookbinding art, the many books encrusted with precious stones all over them, dia- monds, rubies, sapphires, emeralds and many other stones, made one stand awe inspired before them to think that books would be bound in such a lavishness of material wealth. At the very end of the cases in this room, I stopped sur'prised and really thrilled something from home for there in the glass-enclosed case with the other treasures was "Sitting Bull" framed in his Indian buckskin, just as I had seen him hanging in the Harvey houses on the Mojave desert and the Fred Harvey curio stories, only there was no doubt that here there was some valuable manuscript tied up beneath him. It was a long way between our Southwest and the Vatican but all distance was for a moment eliminated.

From Montreaux, that place so full of charm and beauty on one of the Swiss Lakes, made famous by the Castle of Chillon, it is but a few hours journey to Geneva, and the League of Nations Palace, where I had the great pleasure of a visit with Miss Wilson, the lilirarian of the League of Nations Library. Before having my appointment Avith Miss Wilson, .however, one of the two American attend- ants whose special business it is to receive American visitors and escort them through the palace, explaining the league, its functions and results, conducted us through a portion of the library and dwelt especially upon the important part that the library plays in ^hp life of the league ; the absolute necessity for it when decisions of questions arising between states are now based upon facts and not upon political expediency. I would not attempt to go into details about the League of Nations Library after a short visit of less than two hours, but would refer all readers to that very fine article on the subject written by Miss Wilson in the Lihrarij Journal of December 15, 1922. The great scope of the library and the opportunities for world-wide good and the privileges it enjoys in promoting better understanding between nations based on facts, impresses one so deeply that you wish that you could be suddenly elevated to the millionaire class, so you could ha\'e the privilege of endowing a lieauliful library building to house such a distinctive international library.

Heidelberg University Library in the beautiful town of Heidelberg is housed in a large gray stone building, one of the

NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES. [Jan., 1926

university group. It i.s built with a loug curved corridor iu the front and sides of the building, on one side of which are small seminar r'ooms devoted to special subjects and special collections, and in the heart of the building rise the several stoi'ies of .stacks that take care of the several million volumes that the library has. for this is one of the largest libraries in Europe, and second in Germany in point of munber of. volumes, only to the library in Leipzig. The librarian very kindly showed me the library in detail. The catalog was in large volumes, which we would probably find cumbersome to handle after being used to our card catalog system. There was a small room that contained many rare manuscripts and autographed letters which held much interest.

The library in the Peace Palace at The Hague was the next visited in an all too brief a stop of about four hours at The Hague on the way from Amsterdam to Brus.sels. so the visit to the Peace I'rtlace Library consisted of a brief ten minutes during the round of the Peace Palace, but it was made very enjoyable hy the cordiality of the assistant librarian, the librarian Ijeing away on his vacation.

Naturally one of the libraries in 'Europe that interested me most was the little "Joyou.s Hour" (L'heure joyeuse) in Brussels, the first children's library estab- lished in Europe. I had not thought to make note of the address before leaving home, so had to apply to the United States Consul in Brussels for the infor- mation. It so happened that in most of the libraries I visited it was vacation time for the librarian, so I did not meet Mme Huvelle Leve, the librarian, but Miss Smelten. the assistant librarian, a graduate of the American Library in Paris, very graciously made me welcome. Five years ago when this library was started the American Library Association gave the first books and furniture to start with. The City of Brussels gave 2500 francs for books and has done so each year for new books and binding, and pays the librarian and her assistant. The quarters of the library consists of two rooms but with such a wide archway that it has the appearance of one room. It is attractively furnished and has some beautiful .Jessie Wilcox Smith's and other illustrators' pictures on the wall, the gift of the artists.

Because there are not enough books to be circulated every day. they are only loaned on Sunday from 10 a.m. to 12 m..

l)Ut the library is open for readers every day and they average from about 12 in the mornings to 121 in the afternoons, with a much greater attendance when it rains.

The second Joyous Hour Library was expected to be opened in Bi-ussels in the Rue du Canal in September last with furniture and books given by Mme Lip- pens and the location provided by the city : also 2.500 francs per year and the salary of the librarian.

While in Brussels. I also visited Louvain and what is now left of the great University of Louvain Library. It was a pathetic example of the results of war. Restoration was going on slowly and at the time I was there work had ceased until more money should be avail- able. A new university was being erected, liowever. a short distance from the old with funds provided by the American Foundation for Restoration of France.

The last library visited in Europe was the British Museum Library in London, which was very impressive with its mag- nificent collection of books ; with its rare old books representing the art of printing of many countries of the world : its col- lection representing the fine art of book- binding ; its stamp collection ; and the fine collection of rare manuscripts. One of the autographed letters written by George Washington particularly thrilled me with its ring of true Americanism. One of the official guards told me that the rarest and most valuable books and manuscripts will be gotten out of the cases for refer- ence use and for any individual upon apidication to the head of the department. This surprised me as so many seemed too precious even to touch.

Oxford University Library would have been the last library visited had not plans been necessarily changed. It was a dis- appointment not to have seen it, but will be something to look forward to iu another visit should it ever be made.

In traveling around Europe you realize that one reason why there are not more public libraries in Exirope is because there are so many book stores or vice versa, especially in Holland and Belgium. In Amsterdam and Brussels it seems as though almost every other store is a book store. One also is impressed with what a jjrivilege the people of the United States enjo.v in having their public library sys- tems, and California especiall.v in its county free library system of almost unlimited service.

vol. 21, no. 1]

DISCOVERING CALIFORNIA.

DISCOVERING CALIFORNIA.

By Milton J. Ferguson, Libi'tirian, California State Library.

California ! Who knows the origin of tliat name whose e\'ery letter is an organ pipe of emotions, of adveutnre, of golden dreams come true ! Never was there a time when California was not. She was always beyond the horizon : the land to be discovered by those who followed the gleam. Before men knew her name, they sought her out where she lay listening- to the booming bass of the Pacific's breakers and the aeolian harp of the Sierra's whispering pines. To find her has been the ambition of the stout hearts of the questing nations Uan must have an ob.iective : when he ceases to explore, on the earth, beneath its flood of waters, or in the cloud fields of its steel blue sky, then the world Avill be a dead clod falling into the pit of time.

Columbus in the magical year of 1492 moved out upon an uncharted ocean in his little fleet of duck boats looking for C a 1 i f 0 r n i a and merely discovered America. Twenty years later Yasco Xunez de Balboa was gladdened by his i-are good fortune in being the first of the old world voyagers to look upon Cali- fornia's ocean, the Pacific. Hernando Cortez. spurred on by tales of fabulous wealth, •To-old and silver and precious stones, led expedition after expedition with the hope of setting foot in that earthly paradise which it was never his happy fate to look upon. Coronado, Ulloa. Cardenas. Castillo. Pizarro. hardy explorers, pirates, gentlemen all. strong of heart, facile wielders of ever thirsting rapier and broad sword how they yearned for the California of their fancy.

1.S42 saw .Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo sailing blithely into San Diego Bay. selecting a warm sandy beach whereon to careen his buffeted ship and rid her bottom of the growth of strange new seas. He might have settled there, become the fii'st realtor and president of the chamber of commerce : but instead he coasted northward and visited the i.slands of Catalina, San Clemente and Santa Cruz. Mayhap he beheld visions of rich argosies of commerce to be. of magic marts of trade in this new west, of the rush of eager thousands for a biding place on the ocean's rim. California was discovered. What more could man aspire to? Cabrillo died.

A century and thirtj-'Seveu slow years i rolled by ; then came Sir Francis Drake I

sailing into the l)ay which bears his name. His lust for pieces of eight, his undaunted English courage, his way with rich, easily jiliicked Spaniards filled the strong oak l)od.v of his ship with booty from many lands. He, too, sought to discover California ; and chance, a strong wind, or the W.v scudding fog drifts just suc- ceeded in hiding the glory of the Golden Gate. Strange it is that the second centur.-^' thereafter was fast dropping the curtain of its drama when Sergeant Ortega came upon that great bay whose broad waters offer fair anchorage for the ships of the world. :\rore of California was discovered.

Captain Cook, in the memorable year of 177'G, threading his way through track- less seas Californiaward, chanced upon those pearls of the Pacific Ocean, the Hawaiian Islands. Palou came, and Father Serra, soul questing, thinking to discover the spiritual wealth of a fair new land. .Tedediah Strong Smith, cap- tain of frontiersmen, trapper, explorer. first of the pioneers, heard the call and discovered California by a new route, leading his hardy little band of Ameri- cans westwai-d over prairie and desert and mountain wilderness. Dana, too, seeking health and fortune and Cali- fornia, found rich experiences and gave us magical "Two Years Before the Mast." Sutter. Fremont. Beading, Brannan. Kit Carson. Stockton the flood gates are ojHMi and the world moves forward to disc-over a new home, California.

T'erhaps the day of discovery of a new pliysical California is past; but in men's iH'arts and brains the lure of discovery remains. If we are to vision fairer worlds and higher flights, we must not lose the will to go into far places. The circuit of the earth has been completed, yet every man would be a voyager' to unmapped continents. My appeal is to keep up the age old quest for the unseen, the dreamed of paradise ; to find in the prosaic work that gives the daily bread a strange con- tinent which shall disclose rare beauties, enchanting vistas, rich gems. Like the sailors who struggled against terrors of wind and tide and unknown shore that they might ride at last in quiet waters of the California of their' dreams, modern man nuist seek happiness in discovering such a California as his wits may devise. Discover and live.

*Presented at California Library Association meeting, July 1, 1925.

NEWS NOTES OF CALIFORNIA LIBRARIES.

[Jan., 1926

MAP OF CALIFORNIA SHOWING COUNTIES.

iaf o/' >S/»e V DEL NoETt

■-/tm^J, Ml- »»1 FM.HC1SC0

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vol. 21, 110. 1]

LIST OF COUNTY FREE LIBRARIES.

LIST OF COUNTIES HAVING COUNTY FREE LIBRARIES

Statistics of July 1, 1925.

County

Alameda

Amador

Butte

Colusa

Contra Costa- Fresno

Glenn

Humboldt

Imperial

Inyo

Kern

Kings .-,

Los Angeles

Madera

Merced

Modoc.

Monterey

Napa

Orange

Plumas...

Riverside

Sacramento

San Benito

San Bernardino- -

San Diego

San Joaquin

San Luis Obispo.

San Mateo

Santa Barbara..-

Santa Clara

Santa Cruz

Siskiyou

Solano

Stanislaus

Sutter

Tehama

Trinity

Tulare- ---

Tuolumne

Ventura

Yolo

42.

Librarian

Mary Barmby

*BerthaS. Taylor

Blanche Chalfant

Ella Packer

Mrs Alice G. Whitbeok.-.

Sarah E. McCardle

Mrs Faye K. Russell

Ida M. Reagan

Evalyn Roman

Anne Margrave

Mrs Julia G. Babcock

Julia Steffa

Lenala A. Martin

Helen E. Vogleson

Blanche Galloway

Minette L. Stoddard

Anna L. Williams

Anne Hadden

Estella DeFord

Margaret Livingston

Edith Gantt

Chas. F.Woods-

Cornelia D. Provines

Florence J. Wheaton

Caroline S. Waters

Eleanor Hitt

fldaE. Condit

Flo A. Gantz

Edna Holroyd

Mrs Frances B. Linn

Elizabeth Stevens

Minerva H. Waterman...

Ellen B. Frink

Clara B. Dills

Bessie B. Silverthom

Frances M. Burket

Anne Bell Bailey

MrsLila D. Adams

Gretchen Flower

Muriel Wright

Elizabeth R. Topping

Nancy C. Laugenour

Established

Sept.

June

Sept.

June

July

Mar.

April

May

Feb.

Sept.

Nov.

June

Sept.

Sept.

May

June

July

Aug.

Feb.

Dec.

Sept.

Nov.

Oct.

Feb.

July

April

Mar.

July

Sept.

Feb.

July

Oct.

June

April

Aug.

May

Aug.

Sept.

June

July

April

July

,1910 , 1919 , 1913 :, 1915 , 1913 I, 1910 ;, 1914 :, 1914 i, 1912 , 1913 ., 1910 , 1912 , 1915 i, 1912 , 1910 , 1910 , 1915 I, 1912 ', 1916 , 1919 , 1915 , 1911 , 1908 , 1918 , 1913 ., 1912 , 1910 , 1915 , 1912 , 1910 , 1912 , 1916 , 1915 , 1914 , 1911 , 1917 , 1916 , 1916 I 1910 , 1917 , 1915 :, 1910

Ol,'08-D9,'19

Income 1924-251

S47,389 00

6,144 14

18,173 69

10,955 55

50,761 88

149,874 95

16,104 92

27,664 44

12,748 01

9,300 45

94,142 32

30.266 87 13,926 31

290,000 78

21.267 77 41,725 76

4,096 99

20,.505 06

11,421 99

25,987 00

10,548 59

14,299 83

35,028 02

9,370 13

33,314 71

30,948 63

30,260 00

15,259 26

15,999 03

22,066 00

28,635 23

8,500 32

18,249 01

23,019 72

28,898 03

14,881 05

10,875 50

4,426 62

42,209 29

8,373 24

27,713 60

17,860 44

Sl,353,094 13

Books, etc.

116,570 14,628 62,539

a43,257

142,657

357,097 43,549 82,105 75,799 26,361

239,226

103,315 37,457

497,450 80,447

103,850 12,538 76,482 22,823 53,762 33,672 0 61,104 30,025 91,100 90,833 0 42,175

a32,045 0 96,653 0 72,964 61,430 79,859 31,694 36.694 17.152

109,367 23,655 65,916 80,725

a3,248,975

Branches

256 64

163 81 43

187 58 74

338 72 81 32

1.57 77 57 75 86

109 76

133

136

122 98 64

110 98 92

152 66 71 42 73 57

122 61

4,121

Total active school dists. in county ''

51 35 66 33 65

179 45

111 59 32

106 40 42

161 51 73 44 98 51 58 30 73 80 37 71

115 92 93 42

55

36 55 25 133 32 57 47

Active school dists. that have joined